Tough as Nails: One Woman's Journey Through West Point (2020)

Tough as Nails: One Woman's Journey Through West Point Gail O'Sullivan Dwyer Tough as Nails One Woman s Journey Through West Point Tough as Nails is one woman s account of her personal experiences and the lessons learned from them it is how West Point engraved Duty Honor and Country onto her soul Tough as Nails gives you the We
  • Title: Tough as Nails: One Woman's Journey Through West Point
  • Author: Gail O'Sullivan Dwyer
  • ISBN: 9781555716639
  • Page: 353
  • Format: Paperback
Tough as Nails: One Woman's Journey Through West Point Gail O'Sullivan Dwyer Tough as Nails is one woman s account of her personal experiences and the lessons learned from them it is how West Point engraved Duty, Honor, and Country onto her soul Tough as Nails gives you the West Point experience You ll see it, feel it and learn something from it You ll smile and you ll laugh This is the story that Erma Bombeck would have written had she been aTough as Nails is one woman s account of her personal experiences and the lessons learned from them it is how West Point engraved Duty, Honor, and Country onto her soul Tough as Nails gives you the West Point experience You ll see it, feel it and learn something from it You ll smile and you ll laugh This is the story that Erma Bombeck would have written had she been a member of the Class of 1981, the second class with women at WestPoint.Tough as Nails is than a coming of age memoir Originally written to assist her in her role as a West Point admissions liaison officer, the author shares knowledge gained in her 15 years working with admissions.
Tough as Nails: One Woman's Journey Through West Point Gail O'Sullivan Dwyer

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    Gail O'Sullivan Dwyer

One thought on “Tough as Nails: One Woman's Journey Through West Point

  1. Bob Mayer

    Just finished reading this and it brought back a lot of memories as I am a classmate of Gail s We also ran on the marathon team together.Taking that aside, I felt this was an accurate and objective assessment of the early years when women came into West Point In my company, G 1, we had women from the class of 80 as yearlings and then class of 82 I always believed a woman had to work twice as hard at the Academy to get through, especially plebe year The key was to be invisible but that was imposs [...]

  2. Liralen

    Oh, man Such an opportunity wasted There s a fascinating story to be told here, but the book is so short that much of the story slips through the cracks The author s voice, while unique enough, is undeveloped with a stronger editor she might have had a compelling story I very much wish that she d gone deeper into the story and offered a better understanding of what it was like to be in the second class of women at West Point as it is, the bones are there, but the flesh is lacking.

  3. Stephen D. Faoro

    Got a daughter looking at the Long Gray Line Must ReadWell written, funny, emotional honest As a father with a daughter headed this direction, much appreciated Thank You

  4. Mo

    As a grad of the same fine institution, I was there when the Senior class was still all male I have read several books about West Point and I have always tried to temper the reading with the person s personal reasons for writing the book For example Lucian Trescott was left the military as a 2nd Lieutenant and his books reflect a pattern of hatred against the military and the academy I remember Gail O Sullivan She was and probably still is a person of outstanding character I was so impressed wit [...]

  5. Tracy

    I m always impressed when people remember things that happened at West Point I have blocked out most of those four years for some reason It was interesting to read about training for the class of 1981 and contrast it with the bits that I remember from 1985 We did not get to experience Recondo at Buckner, so the description of it was of great interest.This is a book any future cadet should read, male or female Some things have changed technology is a big difference , but West Point is the institu [...]

  6. Lani

    Pretty quick read written from the perspective of one of the first women at West Point Dwyer makes every effort to make it clear that this is HER story and it is not necessarily indicative of anyone else s experiences She had a generally positive experience in the military despite a variety of health concerns that she seems to shrug off as she goes.Writing is alright, and it s worth the read as a window into a time and place that very few could give an accurate picture of But it s nothing mind b [...]

  7. Ruth

    The book was interesting The author got through West Point with no self confidence or athletic skills or conditioning I think you d have to be mentally very tough to endure that experience.She didn t seem to have any idea what she was doing there, or how to prepare for it such as getting in good shape.I d like to have read even details of the tough aspects of the experience physical conditioning, plebe experience, etc Also about her military experience.

  8. Michelle

    I ve been fascinated by The West Point U.S Military Academy ever since I visited for work last September, and this book gave me an interesting perspective of it from a woman who was in the 2nd graduating class to allow women at West Point I thought the book was a quick, interesting read, but the author was all over the place with the story line and some of the military lingo was over my head I d still recommend it for anyone interested in West Point, women s equality, or both.

  9. Emilie

    The author, a member of the second West Point class to admit women, doesn t claim that this work is a study in military sociology, feminist politics, or even history, which is good, because it is not A quick read that was okay, neither terrible nor a must read, about one woman s experience in the days when West Point was just beginning to admit women cadets.

  10. Amy Sjoquist

    Read up to 68 Not what I was looking for in a book The woman went through West Point starting the second year women were allowed to enter But she went without any real knowledge of what it was all about Her brother went before her so that is why she wanted to go She had no real sense of patriotism or any desire to be in the military I couldn t get past her first year Disappointed.

  11. Kimberley Shaw

    O Sullivan truly did have a bit to learn when she began her West Point career Not a long book, but a highly enjoyable one I have long wondered what it was like to be one of that first generation of female West Pointers, and I recommend this book for those who d like to find out.

  12. Amie Schumacher

    I ve always been fascinated by military life hear it from a female who was in the 2nd class of co eds was a treat I found Gail s writing to be witty and insightful a true pleasure to read

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